Dhaka Courier

The Democratic Republic of Congo has confirmed the first case of Ebola in the eastern city of Goma

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The Democratic Republic of Congo has confirmed the first case of Ebola in the eastern city of Goma, a major transport hub. The World Health Organization (WHO) said the case could be a "game-changer" given the city's population of more than two million. But the WHO expressed confidence in plans to deal with the diagnosis.

DR Congo's health ministry said a pastor tested positive after arriving in the city by bus. More than 1,600 people have died since the Ebola outbreak began in eastern DR Congo a year ago - the second biggest outbreak ever. The WHO director-general, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said an emergency meeting is being convened. The health ministry said in a statement that there was a low risk of the disease spreading. It said everyone else on the bus - a driver and 18 other passengers - had been tracked down and they would be vaccinated.

 

A U.K. newspaper published more leaked memos revealing a British ambassador’s blunt assessments of the Trump administration, including one in which the envoy to Washington claimed President Donald Trump pulled out of the Iran nuclear deal to spite predecessor Barack Obama. In the May 2018 cable published by the Mail on Sunday, U.K. Ambassador Kim Darroch called Trump’s decision to abandon the international accord “an act of diplomatic vandalism, seemingly for ideological and personality reasons” because the pact “was Obama’s deal.”

Darroch wrote the memo after then-Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson visited Washington in a failed attempt to persuade the United States not to abandon the 2015 nuclear agreement.

 

Islamic extremists blew up the gate of a Somali hotel with a car bomb and took over the building for more than 14 hours, leaving 26 people dead before Somali forces who besieged the hotel overnight killed the attackers. The victims included a prominent Canadian-Somali journalist .

Three Kenyans, three Tanzanians, two Americans and a Briton also were among the dead, said Ahmed Madobe, the president of Jubbaland regional state which controls Kismayo. Fifty-six people, including two Chinese, were injured in the hotel attack, he told reporters. At least four al-Shabab assailants attacked the Asasey Hotel Friday evening, beginning with a suicide car bomb at the entrance gate and followed by an assault by gunmen who stormed the hotel, which is frequented by politicians, patrons and lawmakers.

 

More than 820 million people worldwide are still going hungry, according to a UN report that says reaching the target of zero hunger by 2030 is “an immense challenge”. The number of people with not enough to eat has risen for the third year in a row as the population increases, after a decade when real progress was made. The underlying trend is stabilisation, when global agencies had hoped it would fall.

Millions of children are not getting the nutrition they need. The UN says the pace of progress in halving child stunting and reducing the number of low birthweight babies is too slow, which jeopardises the chances of achieving another of the sustainable development goals. The report is from the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, the International Fund for Agricultural Development, the UN Children’s Fund (Unicef), the World Food Programme and the World Health Organization.

  • DhakaCourier
  • Issue 2
  • World this week
  • Vol 36

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